Substance Abuse Group Therapy Activities that Work

Alcohol Rehab in Columbus OHGoing into a group therapy session can be a bit intimidating. Knowing ahead of time some things to expect can help. We have come up with some really great topics and activities you might expect in a group session. Check out the tips from our center for alcohol rehab in Columbus OH.

  • Write in stream of consciousness form for a set amount of time. Write down whatever comes to mind, even if it’s “I can’t think of anything to write.” Just put pencil to paper and see what emerges. Everyone takes the time to share his or her writing when the time is up.
  • Work through the famous trolley thought experiment as a group. In short, would you pull a lever that would save the lives of five people on a runaway train if it meant that you would be responsible for diverting the train onto another track on which it would run over one person? This prompts discussion of morals and ethics while encouraging people to think critically and voice their opinions in a constructive manner.
  • What words would you use to describe yourself? What words would others use to describe you? What words would you use to describe an ideal person? How and why do these descriptions differ?
  • The group leader could write different labels on name tags and stick one on the back of each person. Labels can include things like addict, criminal, arrogant, depressed, liar, rich, poor, sick, stupid, etc. Then everyone should walk around the room treating each other according to their label. Each person must figure out what their label says by the way that people are treating them. This is a wonderful way to examine stereotypes and treatment of others.
  • Tense up your muscles then progressively relax them. Discuss the impact of stress and the importance of letting it go.
  • Take turns sharing a personal emotional story. The others in the group should try to identify the emotions you felt. Discuss the difficulty of identifying emotions, both personally and externally.
  • Take turns playing an instrument that can be passed around the group, such as a Tibetan singing bowl.
  • Share a song with the group that has real meaning for you and explain why. Listen to the meaningful songs that others bring to the group and appreciate that everyone derives inspiration from various sources.
  • Practice meditation: close your eyes, breathe deeply, and try to clear your mind.
  • Practice anger management skills. What makes you angry? What can you do to prevent getting angry? What can you do to keep your anger under control?
  • Play charades. Practice expressing yourself without speaking. Discuss the importance of body language.
  • Participate in a role-playing mock interview. Play the role of someone who has been affected by your substance use (ex. a mother, a daughter, a friend, etc.) Others in the group will ask questions and you should answer in character. Discuss the importance of empathy and “walking a mile in someone else’s shoes.”
  • Make a list of your unhealthy habits. What makes them bad? What can you do instead when you are tempted to engage in the habit? Discuss ways to replace the unhealthy habits with healthier ones.
  • Make a list of the best moments in your life. Make a list of the worst moments of your life. What made them good or bad? Can you identify any patterns or similarities between the events?
  • Make a list of activities to do instead of using drugs. What can you do when you’re faced with cravings? What can you do to prevent cravings in the first place?
  • Learn about and discuss the neuroscience of addiction.
  • Learn about and discuss the effects of opioids.
  • Learn about and discuss the effects of alcohol.
  • Identify and discuss triggers for substance use. What kinds of coping strategies can you use to overcome your triggers? Can you identify any patterns?
  • Everyone should anonymously write a fear on a piece of paper and put it into a bowl. The bowl should then be passed around the group and everyone should draw a piece of paper and talk about the fear they selected. How do you think the person who wrote on that piece of paper developed their fear? Do you share the same fear? Can you think of any ways to conquer that fear or turn it into something constructive? Do this exercise with other emotions and scenarios as well to further practice empathy.
  • Discuss where you think you are in your recovery journey. Talk about what you’ve accomplished and what you would like to accomplish in the future. Ask everyone else what he or she thinks you’ve accomplished and what they would like to see you accomplish in the future.
  • Discuss the importance of sleep. What are your sleep goals? What are you currently doing to achieve these goals? What can you do in the future? What should you stop doing? Would you say you currently have a healthy sleep regimen? Why or why not?
  • Discuss the importance of self-care. What are your self-care goals? What are you currently doing to achieve these goals? What can you do in the future? What should you stop doing? Would you say you currently have a healthy self-care regimen? Why or why not?
  • Discuss the importance of physical fitness. What are your fitness goals? What are you currently doing to achieve these goals? What can you do in the future? What should you stop doing? Would you say you currently have a healthy fitness regimen? Why or why not?
  • Discuss the importance of nutrition. What are your nutrition goals? What are you currently doing to achieve these goals? What can you do in the future? What should you stop doing? Would you say you have a healthy relationship with food? Why or why not?
  • Discuss the impact of language. How do certain words influence our thoughts and actions? Why are some words considered “bad” and others “good?” Are there any words that you strongly associate with substance use? How can you use your word choices to harm or support others? How can you use your word choices to harm or support yourself?
  • Discuss gratitude. What is gratitude? What are you grateful for and why?
  • Discuss forgiveness. Is there anyone in your life that you would like to forgive? What would you say to them in that scenario? What would you like them to know? How would you like them to respond?

If you're drinking too much and need rehab for alcohol in Columbus, keep reading.

Affordable Alcohol Rehab in Columbus OH For 2018

If you find that you or a family member needs alcohol rehab in Columbus OH, Legacy Freedom Treatment Center can help. We provide a safe, intimate setting where you can receive a personalized treatment program designed just for you. We want to be your partner in helping you find what you need to get you living the life you deserve. Call or click today!

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