Heroin Epidemic: How Bad Is It?

Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Charlotte NCDo you or someone you love suffer from an addiction to heroin? If so, it's time to consider the facts. The use of heroin in the U.S. is growing rapidly. Our substance abuse treatment centers in Charlotte NC have seen a number of addicts join our rehabilitation programs to get help. Unfortunately, things seem to be getting worse.

The heroin epidemic is becoming a serious problem in the United States. The CDC has been closly monitoring this situation since early 2000 but have realized in the last two years, it’s getting worse. Below, you’ll find several facts and statistics that show exactly how bad the epidemic is getting, according to cdc.org

Heroin Use in the U.S. | Substance Abuse Treatment Centers Charlotte NC

 

  • Since 2000, the rate of deaths from 2000drug overdoses has increased 137%, including a 200% increase in the rate of overdose deaths involving opioids (opioid pain relievers and heroin).
  • During 2014, a total of 47,055 drug overdose deaths occurred in the United States, representing a 1-year increase of 6.5%, from 13.8 per 100,000 persons in 2013 to 14.7 per 100,000 persons in 2014.
  • The rate of drug overdose deaths increased significantly for both sexes, persons aged 25–44 years and ≥55 years, and in the Northeastern, Midwestern, and Southern regions of the United States.
  • Rates of opioid overdose deaths also increased significantly, from 7.9 per 100,000 in 2013 to 9.0 per 100,000 in 2014, a 14% increase.
  • Historically, CDC has programmatically characterized all opioid pain reliever deaths (natural and semisynthetic opioids, methadone, and other synthetic opioids) as "prescription" opioid overdoses.
  • Between 2013 and 2014, the age-adjusted rate of death involving methadone remained unchanged; however, the age-adjusted rate of death involving natural and semisynthetic opioid pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids, other than methadone (e.g., fentanyl) increased 9%, 26%, and 80%, respectively.
  • The sharp increase in deaths involving synthetic opioids, other than methadone, in 2014 coincided with law enforcement reports of increased availability of illicitly manufactured fentanyl, a synthetic opioid; however, illicitly manufactured fentanyl cannot be distinguished from prescription fentanyl in death certificate data. These findings indicate that the opioid overdose epidemic is worsening.
  • Drug overdose deaths were classified using the International Classification of Disease, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), based on the ICD-10 underlying cause-of-death codes X40–44 (unintentional), X60–64 (suicide), X85 (homicide), or Y10–Y14 (undetermined intent) (2).
  • Among the deaths with drug overdose as the underlying cause, the type of opioid involved is indicated by the following ICD-10 multiple cause-of-death codes: opioids (T40.0, T40.1, T40.2, T40.3, T40.4, or T40.6); natural and semisynthetic opioids (T40.2); methadone (T40.3); synthetic opioids, other than methadone (T40.4); and heroin (T40.1).
  • Some deaths involve more than one type of opioid; these deaths were included in the rates for each category (e.g., a death involving both a synthetic opioid and heroin would be included in the rates for synthetic opioid deaths and in the rates for heroin deaths).
  • Age-adjusted death rates were calculated by applying age-specific death rates to the 2000 U.S standard population age distribution. Significance testing was based on the z-test at a significance level of 0.05.
  • During 2014, 47,055 drug overdose deaths occurred in the United States. Since 2000, the age-adjusted drug overdose death rate has more than doubled, from 6.2 per 100,000 persons in 2000 to 14.7 per 100,000 in 2014.
  • The overall number and rate of drug overdose deaths increased significantly from 2013 to 2014, with an additional 3,073 deaths occurring in 2014, resulting in a 6.5% increase in the age-adjusted rate.
  • From 2013 to 2014, statistically significant increases in drug overdose death rates were seen for both males and females, persons aged 25–34 years, 35–44 years, 55–64 years, and ≥65 years, and residents in the Northeast, Midwest and South Census Regions.
  • In 2014, the five states with the highest rates of drug overdose deaths were West Virginia (35.5 deaths per 100,000), New Mexico (27.3), New Hampshire (26.2), Kentucky (24.7) and Ohio (24.6).
  • States with statistically significant increases in the rate of drug overdose deaths from 2013 to 2014 included Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
  • In 2014, 61% (28,647, data not shown) of drug overdose deaths involved some type of opioid, including heroin.
  • The age-adjusted rate of drug overdose deaths involving opioids increased significantly from 2000 to 2014, increasing 14% from 2013 (7.9 per 100,000) to 2014 (9.0).
  • From 2013 to 2014, the largest increase in the rate of drug overdose deaths involved synthetic opioids, other than methadone (e.g., fentanyl and tramadol), which nearly doubled from 1.0 per 100,000 to 1.8 per 100,000.
  • Heroin overdose death rates increased by 26% from 2013 to 2014 and have more than tripled since 2010, from 1.0 per 100,000 in 2010 to 3.4 per 100,000 in 2014.
  • In 2014, the rate of drug overdose deaths involving natural and semisynthetic opioids (e.g., morphine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone), 3.8 per 100,000, was the highest among opioid overdose deaths, and increased 9% from 3.5 per 100,000 in 2013.
  • The rate of drug overdose deaths involving methadone, a synthetic opioid classified separately from other synthetic opioids, was similar in 2013 and 2014.

As you can see, this problem is getting much worse. As the years go by, the epidemic is strengthening. Heroin is a seriously dangerous drug. It's important to use these facts and statistics to bring about awareness to those that aren't quite familiar with the dangers of heroin.

If you need more facts, be sure to visit our previous blog, here. We talk more about heroin, offering more information and how to identify its street names.

Substance Abuse Treatment Centers Charlotte NC

If you’re suffering from an addiction and need help, consider contacting our substance abuse treatment centers in Charlotte NC.  Addiction isn’t something that can be beaten easily. Often it requires extensive rehab and support. Legacy Freedom is here to offer both to you, when you’re ready. Addiction can leave you feeling sad, lonely, and angry. You are not alone. Legacy Freedom is here to help you get back on track to a happier, healthy, drug free life. Contact us to learn more.

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